Friday, April 28, 2017

The Money Tree Pushing for One SA Bond Election

So, San Antonio, who is investing and how much money are they investing to get you to vote "YES" on city 2017 bond election? Businesses, groups, and individuals are spending a lot of capital for your “YES” vote.

Early voting has started, and on May 6th, the city of San Antonio wants voters to approve the largest bond proposal in the city's history. The city wants to borrow $850 million for improvements and upkeep of streets, sidewalks, parks, buildings and more.


There is a fairly large list of contributors pushing the bond using the campaign slogan "One SA" or in simple terms, the political action committee set up to push the bond. Roughly $680,755 has been contributed to the campaign. Much of the money is coming from developers, construction companies, businesses, politicians, and engineering firms...some who want a share of the action from all the projects.

Here's the list of contributors in its entirety as of April 24, 2017:
  • AIA Engineers $1,000
  • Archer Group $500
  • Ashley Barth $25
  • Demonte Alexander $20
  • Steven Lee, Lee Partners $1,000
  • AREA Real Estate LLC $15,000
  • Cavender Brothers Management $15,000
  • Centro Alliance San Antonio $30,000
  • Chris Carruth, Metropol. Planning $1,500
  • Civil Design Srvc/CDS Muery $12,500
  • CP&Y $2,500
  • GRAYSTREET LIGHT,LP $15,000
  • Hixon Properties $15,000
  • Jane Macon $500
  • Maestas & Associates $500
  • Overland Partners - $5,000
  • Phil Hardberger $2,500
  • SA Chapter of AGC $1,000
  • Terracon $5,000
  • Jim Campbell $318
  • Carri Baker $100
  • Linebarger $5,000
  • Berltex Real Estate Holdings $100
  • Raba Kistner $10,000
  • LJA Engineering $5,000
  • Civil Engineering Consultants $10,000
  • Freese Nichols $2,500
  • Gene Dawson, Jr. $5,000
  • Guido Brothers $5,000
  • K Friese & Assoc $500
  • LNV Inc $10,000
  • LPA Inc $5,000
  • MW Cude Engineers $10,000
  • Pape-Dawson Inc $10,000
  • Poznecki Camarillo $2,500
  • Sam Dawson $5,000
  • Steve Patmon, SJPA $2,500
  • WSP Parsons Brinckerhof $1,500
  • Sandra Hamby, MOCA $500
  • NuStar $7,500
  • Big Red Dog $2,500
  • CRT Flooring $500
  • Gibson Plumbing $1,000
  • Manco Structures $1,000
  • Miller Plumbing $1,000
  • Monticello Homes $5,000
  • South TX Chapter NECA $1,000
  • SA Builders PAC $3,000
  • Structural Engineering Associates $5,000
  • HNTB $5,000
  • Jones Carter $5,000
  • Zachry Group $5,000
  • Beaty Palmer Architects $5,000
  • Brian Dillard $20
  • Brian Dillard $20
  • Demonte Alexander $20
  • Desi Canela $20
  • Juan Antonio Flores $250
  • Martin Aguirre $20
  • Mike Kaiman (turner const) $2,000
  • Roland Mower $500
  • Alamo Architects $5,000
  • Brown & Ortiz $1,000
  • Christus Health $10,000
  • HVHC $10,000
  • NRP $10,000
  • WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff $1,500
  • Alterman Inc $5,000
  • Catto & Catto $2,500
  • KCI - $2,500
  • LAN Inc $5,000
  • Marmon Mok $2,500
  • McCall & Associates AIA Architects $1,500
  • Zachry Corp $10,000
  • InTEC $5,000
  • Marc A. Rodriguez $5,000
  • Norton Rose Fulbright $5,000
  • Alamo City's Elite Electric $500
  • Chuck Saxer $100
  • Grace Joseph, Platinum Title Partners $150
  • Bennett Feinsilber $100
  • Arias Geoprofessionals $3,000
  • SpawGlass $3,000
  • BGE Inc (Brown & Gay Inc) $5,000
  • Martin Marietta $5,000
  • RVK Inc $2,500
  • Sabinal Group $500
  • USAA $15,000
  • Valero $10,000
  • E-Z Bel Construction $10,000
  • Garcia & Wright Consulting Engineers Inc $5,000
  • Geoscience Engineering & Testing Inc $2,500
  • Hornberger Fuller & Garza $1,000
  • TEDSI Infrastructure $10,000
  • Ancira Enterprises $5,000
  • Bain Medina Bain, Inc $1,000
  • Bartlett Cocke $5,000
  • BARTON, EAST & CALDWELL, PLLC $500
  • Central Electric $5,000
  • Ford Powell & Carson $1,500
  • HCDT Insurance $1,000
  • Red McCombs $1,000
  • TTL/Drash Consultants $5,000
  • Demonte Alexander $121
  • Kevin Shandy $20
  • The Levy Company, LP $5,000
  • Beldon Roofing Company $1,000
  • Davidson Troilo Ream & Garza, PC $500
  • Gloria Hernandez $20
  • Jim Reed $100
  • Whitman, Requardt and Associates* $500
  • Jack Laurence Corporation* $500
  • Jeff and Melinda Buell* $1,000
  • John Clamp* $100
  • Kim Lubel* $500
  • Sitterle Homes* $1,000
  • Bella Vista Homes* $1,000
  • Bracewell & Giuliani Committee* $2,500
  • Foster CM Group Inc * $500
  • Kaufman & Killen* $1,000
  • Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.* $1,000
  • Parra & Co LLC* $1,000
  • Claudia Bazaldua $20
  • Eugene Simor $20
  • Jenee Gonzales $20
  • Kevin Shandy $20
  • Laura Jess $20
  • Melissa Aguirre $20
  • Michelle Swisher $20
  • Miriam Johnson $20
  • Neriza Simor $20
  • Paul McLornan $20
  • Phyllis Kruciak $20
  • Sarah McLornan $20
  • Sharon Blacknall $20
  • Joeris Construction $1,000
  • Big State Electric* $5,000
  • Broadway Bank * $1,000
  • Camacho-Hernandez & Assoc - $5,000
  • Cleary Zimmermann* $1,000
  • D. Plata Construction CO, LLC* $1,000
  • Graham Weston* $25,000
  • HEB* $10,000
  • InSite Partners* $1,000
  • Judy Morton* $500
  • South Texas Renal Care Group* $500
  • TBG Partners*- $500
  • Vickery & Associates Inc $10,000
  • VK KNOWLTON CONSTRUCTION AND UTILITIES * $1,000
  • Cobb Fendley & Assoc $5,000
  • Golden Steves & Gordon LLP $500
  • Gonzalez-De La Garza & Assoc* $500
  • GTM Washington Square LTD* $5,000
  • HDS/ Felipe Hinojosa $500
  • Jacobs $10,000
  • Judy Perez $1,000
  • Maestas & Associates* $500
  • Scott B Retzloff & Associates* $500
  • Tenet Health (baptist) $10,000
  • Winstead* $500
  • William Raba (event rental and catering in-kind)
  • Alcide Logoria $20
  • Athena Domain Inc $1,000
  • Chesney Morales Partners Inc $1,000
  • Sundt Companies $10,000
  • Lone Star Capital Bank $500
  • D. Wilson Construction $1,000
  • Kassahn & Ortiz PC 1000
  • CH2M* $1,000
  • Mosaic Land Development $3,000
  • Bill Greehey $5,000
  • CNG Enineering $1,000
  • Caterpillar $5,000
  • Halff and Associates $7,500
  • Unintech $5,000
  • Stantec $5,000
  • Texas Capital Bank * $1,000
  • Sanchez & Salazar $500
  • CP&Y $2,500
  • IDC Inc $10,000
  • Spectrum Lighting Inc $500
  • Lisa Friel, Ernst & Young $1,000
  • RPS Klotz * $5,000
  • KFW Engineers & Surveying* $1,000
  • Dykema Cox Smith* $5,000
  • IBC Bank $10,000
  • Wills Raba* $100
  • Jasmine Engineering* $500
  • HDR $10,000
  • Rock Engineering & Testing Lab $3,000
  • Holt CAT $10,000
  • Valero $10,000
  • Computer Solutions $5,000
  • John Feik $250.00
TOTAL $680,755

NOTE...SOME INFORMATION LISTED IS FROM LOCAL AND CITY SOURCES.

Thursday, April 27, 2017

San Antonio TX 2017 Bond Election Ballot - Are You Confused?


When you go to vote for the multi-million dollar 2017 San Antonio TX bond election you might be confused with how politicians and bureaucrats put the ballot together. You are asked to vote for or against a bond that will cost taxpayers more than its face value. Yet as it is presented, it makes it hard not to get frustrated and say “Sure…why not…I’ll vote ‘FOR’ since I have no idea what I’m voting for or against!”

The city scribes try to make it simple for voters to decide on what we want to pay for when the city bond is sold to investors. The bond is broken up into “propositions.” Each proposition tells the voter what part of the bond it will pay for but with few facts given about the proposition listed.

The problem I see is how the propositions are presented to the voter. Unless you’ve done some homework on the bond election, you may not know the details of the specific proposition. The political/lawyer speak may also be perplexing to some folks. Your eyes may want a “do over” after looking at the information clumped into what looks like one big run-on sentence. To make it a bit more confusing, the ballot is in English and Spanish so as to be politically correct. I thought English was the official language of the United States!

Below (in capital letters) is a sample ballot for the city of San Antonio bond issue…please note that I’ve inserted spaces and left out the Spanish to make it a little clearer to the reader. I hope it helps you decide how to vote.


STREETS, BRIDGES, AND SIDEWALKS IMPROVEMENTS PROPOSITION

PROPOSITION NO. 1 “THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS IN THE AMOUNT OF $445,263,000 FOR STREETS, BRIDGES, AND SIDEWALKS IMPROVEMENTS AND LEVYING A TAX IN PAYMENT THEREOF”

DRAINAGE AND FLOOD CONTROL IMPROVEMENTS PROPOSITION

PROPOSITION NO. 2 "THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS IN THE AMOUNT OF $138,988,000 FOR DRAINAGE AND FLOOD CONTROL IMPROVEMENTS AND LEVYING A TAX IN PAYMENT THEREOF"

PARKS, RECREATION, AND OPEN SPACE IMPROVEMENTS PROPOSITION

PROPOSITION NO. 3 “THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS IN THE AMOUNT OF $187,313,000 FOR PARKS, RECREATION, AND OPEN SPACE IMPROVEMENTS AND LEVYING A TAX IN PAYMENT THEREOF”

LIBRARY AND CULTURAL FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS PROPOSITION

PROPOSITION NO. 4 “THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS IN THE AMOUNT OF $24,025,000 FOR LIBRARY AND CULTURAL FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS AND LEVYING A TAX IN PAYMENT THEREOF”

PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS PROPOSITION

PROPOSITION NO. 5 “THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS IN THE AMOUNT OF $34,411,000 FOR PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS AND LEVYING A TAX IN PAYMENT THEREOF”

NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS (2017 URBAN RENEWAL PLAN IMPLEMENTATION) PROPOSITION

PROPOSITION NO. 6 “THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS IN THE AMOUNT OF $20,000,000 FOR FUNDING COSTS OF AND IMPLEMENTING THE CITY'S 2017 URBAN RENEWAL PLAN AND LEVYING A TAX IN PAYMENT THEREOF”

If you would like more information on each proposition, got to the North Central Thousand Oaks Neighborhood Association website and check this link…http://www.nctona.com/node/171

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

SAN ANTONIO TX 2017 BOND ELECTION – HOW DOES YOUR VOTE PAY OUT

READERS CAN FIND THE INFORMATION BELOW ON THE NORTH CENTRAL THOUSAND OAKS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION SAN ANTONIO, TX WEBSITE:


http://www.nctona.com/node/171

I AM POSTING THIS WITH THEIR PERMISSION AND FOR YOUR INFORMATION. I WANT TO GIVE SAN ANTONIO RESIDENTS AN IDEA OF WHAT THE BOND PROPOSAL WILL AND WON’T DO FOR THEIR RESPECTIVE NEIGHBORHOODS.

The bond issue consists of three parts: “Urban Core” projects, “City-wide” projects, and Council District allocations.  The City-wide projects include the “Urban Core” projects which are located largely in Districts One and Two.

URBAN CORE BOND PROJECTS:

  • Broadway Corridor -- $43 Million – mainly street improvements
  • Hemisfair Park -- $26 Million
  • New Police Substation -- $20.5 Million – public facilities
  • San Pedro Creek Development -- $19.5 Million – commercial upgrading, streets
  • Commerce Street -- $20 Million
  • Santa Rosa Street -- $14 Million
  • Alamo-area Streets -- $13.7 Million
  • Main & Soledad Streets -- $12 Million
  • South Alamo Street -- $9 Million
  • Alamo -- $8.7 Million – this falls under “parks”
  • Brackenridge Park -- $7.8 Million
  • Botanical Garden -- $7 Million
  • San Saba Street -- $7 Million
  • Expanded Zoo Parking -- $12 Million
  • Cameron Street -- $4.5 Million
  • Central Library -- $3 Million – this falls under “public facilities”
  • Witte/Brackenridge Parking Garage -- $2 Million – “public facilities”
  • La Villita -- $1.3 Million

GENERAL CITY-WIDE PROJECTS (less Urban Core)

Council Districts 8, 9, 10:

  • Capital Little League Baseball Fields -- $2,000,000 (located in CD-10)
  • Hardberger Park land-bridge -- $15,000,000 (located between CD-8 and CD-9; half roads, half parks)
  • Wurzbach Corridor Improvements (Hardberger Park) -- $2,000,000
  • Classen - Steubing Ranch Park Development -- $5,510,000 (park will be in CD-10)
  • Classen - Steubing Ranch Park Property Acquisition -- $4,000,000
All these issues will be carried under “parks” on the ballot.

All Other Council Districts:

  • Low income housing -- $20,000,000 – falls under “Neighborhood improvements”
  • Public art -- $8,000,000 – “Neighborhood improvements”
  • Port San Antonio Comprehensive Drainage Improvements -- $24,000,000 – falls under “flooding”
  • Vance Jackson Low Water Crossing Improvements -- $6,357,000
  • UTSA Athletics Complex Facilities -- $10,000,000 – carried under “parks”
  • UIW Sports in Brooks City Base -- $2,800,000
  • Brooks City Base South New Braunfels -- $10,400,000 – commercial development, streets
  • Brooks City Base Research Plaza -- $10,000,000 – commercial development, streets        
  • Brooks City Base-Inner Circle Louis Bauer to Research Streets -- $3,000,000
  • World Heritage/ Cultural Arts Center Facilities -- $5,000,000 – falls under “public facilities”
  • World Heritage Park & Land Acquisition -- $2,500,000
  • Lone Star Area Streets (World Heritage) -- $5,000,000 – falls under “streets”
  • World Heritage Trail Signage -- $5,000,000 – falls under “parks”
  • Mission Road San Antonio River -- $2,000,000
  • Martin Luther King Park -- $3,100,000
  • Pearsall Park -- $3,000,000
  • Woodlawn Lake Park -- $3,000,000
  • Roosevelt Avenue HWY 90 to Loop 410 -- $8,000,000 – carried under “streets”
  • Medical Center Phase X Ewing Halsell at Louis Pasteur --$7,170,000 – falls under “public facilities”
  • Medical Center Right Turn Lane Louis Pasteur and Babcock Streets -- $1,600,000
  • South Presa S.E. Military to Southcross -- $5,000,000 – “streets”
  • Southcross IH 37 to IH 35 -- $5,000,000 – “streets”
  • O.P. Schnabel Park Entrance -- $1,100,000
HOW WERE BOND PROJECTS PICKED?

The decision-making that shaped the bond issue was done by three City agencies.  The first is the Council-appointed Planning Commission, consisting of nine members, five of whom (a voting majority) were nominated by the Real Estate Council of San Antonio (RECSA.)  Second, and overseeing the lion’s share of projects, is the City’s Transportation and Capital Improvements Department (TCI) under its director Mike Frisbie.  Third, and to a much lesser degree, the City’s Planning and Community Development Department (PCD), formerly headed by Mr. John Dugan and presently directed by Ms. Bridgett White, solicited citizen input through a series of meetings called “SA Tomorrow.”  Although visionary, the “SA Tomorrow” findings were heavily redacted by the RECSA-dominated Planning Commission members to favor Development interests, especially as they relate to maintaining impervious cover (asphalt and concrete) and continuing environmentally unsound construction techniques which promote flooding and light pollution.

HOW IS THE BOND TO BE FINANCED?

Express-News columnist David Hendricks (Sunday, 2 October 2016) wrote that, due to San Antonio’s excellent “AAA” credit rating, it could obtain bond money for as little as 2.79% per annum.  On $850 million, at that rate the interest would amount to about $24 million per year.  Over ten years, therefore, the bond could cost taxpayers $240 million in interest payments in addition to repayment of principal.  The total cost of Mayor Taylor’s bond by the year 2026 therefore would be in the neighborhood of $1.1 billion.  If financed over twenty years, the cost could rise to $1.35 billion.  Municipal bonds would be issued through Wall Street brokerage houses.  They would be paid off through City taxation.

EXPOSED!! JASON CHAFFETZ TO FEMA OFFICIAL YOU OVERCHARGE TAXPAYERS BY $10

Jason Chaffetz to Mrs Emerson 'millions of tax payers dollars are being...

SEAN HANNITY Issues Warning to Liberals Fascists Who Slander Him - We're...

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

I Got Suspended from Facebook

New Battle of the Alamo - DISHONOR

San Antonio TX plans to DISHONOR the fallen heroes of the Alamo with hip renovations to that historic site! Any renovations are still in the planning stage. 

One plan calls for dismantling the historic Cenotaph monument, also know as the Spirit of Sacrifice, currently located in front of the Alamo and relocating it. The Cenotaph was built to commemorate the Alamo defenders. San Antonio mayor Maury Maverick held a dedication ceremony on November 11, 1940. 

A marker on the Cenotaph reads: “Erected in memory of the heroes who sacrificed their lives at the Alamo, March 6, 1836, in the defense of Texas. They chose never to surrender nor retreat; these brave hearts, with flag still proudly waving, perished in the flames of immortality that their high sacrifice might lead to the founding of this Texas.” 

Another plan levels the plaza in front Alamo and encloses it in a glass display area ala Disney or some other schlock tourist attraction. This plan will also uproot old trees located near the Alamo

Some planners want to turn the Alamo into a historic theme park. Visitors will be treated to a more antique Alamo including a metal on concrete roof that was NOT on the original church. Not such an accurate restoration...right!

Across the street tourist can enjoy a cheesy wax museum and other tourist trap venues. Some businesses near the site have nothing to do with the Alamo. It looks like some San Antonio planners want to make a buck off tourists! 

I have no problem with the city closing streets in front and near the Alamo and making it more pedestrian friendly, but some of the plans turn a historic site into a carnival!