Sunday, November 17, 2013

The Truth About American Coal

The following is from a Newsmax.com email I received. I think you may want to read it and get the real facts behind Barack Obama and his EPA. The Obama Gang lies bleed through this article regarding American coal and the world environment! So, you can just add another lie to Barack Obama's repertoire of falsehoods. Obama never met a lie he couldn't tell!

New EPA Rules Will Have 'No Effect' on Climate Change

Would it be a good idea to shut down America's coal-fired energy industry to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions by a mere 0.01 percent? The Environmental Protection Agency and the Obama administration apparently think so.

The EPA recently proposed new limits on carbon-dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants that would prevent new construction and gradually close older plants.

The EPA maintains the rules will help protect Americans from the ill effects of man-made climate change.

But many scientists challenge the EPA's assertion that carbon dioxide emissions are related to climate change, noted Paul Driessen, senior policy adviser for the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow and author of "Eco-Imperialism: Green Power, Black Death."

Those scientists cite solar, oceanic, and other factors the EPA ignores as potential causes of climate change, and point out that human beings account for just 4 percent of the carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere each year.

And American coal-fired power generation is responsible for just 3 percent of humanity's carbon dioxide emissions.

"In other words, the power plants the EPA wants to shut down account for a trivial 0.01 percent of the carbon dioxide added to Earth's atmosphere annually," Driessen writes in an article for The Washington Times.

He also says that "China, India, Russia, and Brazil alone emit twice as much carbon dioxide as the United States. Therefore, even if the theory that carbon dioxide controls Earth's climate is correct, the new regulations will have no effect on climate change."

They will have an effect on the economy, however. Complying with rules set by the EPA and other federal entities is estimated to cost U.S. businesses $1.8 trillion a year.